Biography of Eliza Williamson


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Eliza Williamson Homer

Eliza Williamson Homer was born in New York state, the daughter of pure blood Dutch, she was the fifth child in a family of nine. Their home was the usual pioneer home built of logs. The country around them was rugged and the winters bitterly cold, hardships plentiful and comforts scarce.

All the clothing was made by the mother and daughters who took the wool off the sheep, washed and carded it and spun and wove it into cloth.

Eliza's family was neighbors and good friends of the Russell King Homer family and she was fond of Russell King Homer. They were married, December 20, 1836, and spent a short honeymoon at Erie, New York.

Eliza and Russell were personally acquainted with Joseph Smith. On one occasion, Eliza was ill with a high fever for weeks and the doctors could not help her. The Elders told her if she would be baptized she would get well. She was baptized in a creek where a hold had been cut in the ice. They put her on a sheet with four men holding each corner and lowered her down into the water. The next morning she got up, dressed herself and was entirely cured of her fever and all other bodily ailments.

Heber C. Kimball asked them to stay where they were and inspect all the cattle and horses before they crossed the Plains. In 1856, they moved to Crescent City, Iowa, where they opened a hotel called the Homer House. They assisted with and furnished transportation for Mormon Elders to travel across the Plains and many more Saints that didn't have the money to travel.

On July 3, 1858, and Independent company left Florence Nebraska, to go to the Salt lake Valley, Russell King Homer was appointed captain.

After two months of Indian conflicts, high waters and dangerous storms they arrived in the Salt Lake Valley, October 8, 1858. Eliza gave her consent for her husband to marry three wives in plural marriage.

Eliza was of a quiet, calm disposition. She was small in stature and kind to everyone. She was a good cook, seamstress and had a hobby of making log cabin quilts and crazy quilts.

Eliza passed away peacefully on June 11, 1912, she was ninety-six years old.

Pioneer Women of Faith and Fortitude




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